Apple leaves more parts unencrypted in iOS 10 beta 2

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iOS-10-beta-2-new-wallpaper-silver-iPhone-screenshot-001
Shortly after the release of the first beta of iOS 10 security experts realized that Apple had left the kernel unencrypted. After speculate on the reason, the Cupertino confirmed that they had left unencrypted because it did not include important user data and improve system performance, which seems to be confirmed after only two betas of the next operating system for iOS devices.

Performance may not be the only reason. Security experts say that in this way some security flaws before be discovered and may also be corrected before. In addition, Ubuntu is one of the safest operating systems for computer and does not have the kernel encryption. But the latest information says that Apple has gone a step further with the launch of the beta 2 of IOS 10 and has left more parts unencrypted.

In addition to the kernel and root filesystem (with few user data) that were already unencrypted in the first beta, the second beta of iOS 10 has left unencrypted bootloaders 32-bit, all ls ramdisks least Apple TV and all kernels. What’s going on here?

All I have left unencrypted images of iOS 10 is what we see with the acronym “SEP”, which means Secure Enclave. We also need to bear in mind that we are talking about launches in beta and it is possible that Apple re-encrypt some images when the system is officially launched, which will take place in September.

iOS-10-beta-2-unencrypted-musclenerdSecure Enclave?

From with the iPhone 5s,  iOS devices have a small chip inside the application processor that is responsible for encrypting data as those written in the flash memory and processes the input Touch ID. This chip is called the Secure Enclave.

No software, hardware service or have access to information stored in Secure Enclave. This small chip has its own firmware, and bootloader code. The “SEP” uses its own memory encrypted and only communicates with the A9, A8 or A7 using a switch where the processor puts some data in a shared memory buffer and then reads back the results.

In any case, if I may preguntarais me if I’m worried about everything that Apple is leaving unencrypted immediate answer would be yes, I have the feeling that the “bad guys” are going to find and exploit bugs sooner. But if I think about it a little, I use Ubuntu on my laptop even before happen to Mac, the system is not encrypted from head to foot and rarely has security. Thanks to the community, Ubuntu security problems solved in literally hours and that’s what could happen from iOS 10.

But hey, we’re talking about betas of iOS 10. This debate will be more interesting if these images are left unencrypted in September.

[Source: MuscleNerd via iGen.fr (Google Translate)]

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